Category: North America (page 1 of 9)

From the Land of Canaan to Canada, Israel’s first hockey star shoots for NHL

David Levin in action while playing for the Toronto-based Don Mills Flyers in the 2014-15 season. (Courtesy)

By Robert Starner – The Times of Israel

 At age 10, David Levin decided it was time to leave the Land of Canaan for Canada — to become a professional ice hockey player.

At the time, the Israeli boy didn’t know how to skate or speak English and had never experienced a Canadian winter. So back in 2010, his parents brushed off his request, thinking it “just a phase.”

Two years later, Levin persisted.

This time, to his surprise, they relented and let him go live in hockey’s promised land with the then-preposterous goal of becoming the first Israeli-born player in the National Hockey League (NHL).

Today, his aspiration is no longer far-fetched: Levin stands a good chance of being selected in the league’s annual draft of young players in June. Thanks to his innate skill, tenacity, hard work and all-consuming sense of purpose, he’s turned what once seemed a highly-improbable mission into a now credible scenario.

Like Omri Casspi, who in 2009 became the first Israeli to compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA), Levin seeks to break new ground for Israeli athletes by being the first to play in the world’s elite professional hockey league.

“I want my country to actually see that I’ll do whatever it takes to make the NHL, which would be a huge accomplishment for both me and for Israel,” says Levin, 18, who was born and grew up in a small town near Netanya. “I want to show everyone that any kid from whatever country can make it in the NHL if he wants to follow his dreams and do what’s necessary.”

How a nice Israeli boy met hockey

Levin spoke with The Times of Israel a few hours before he and his current team, the Sudbury Wolves, played in a recent Ontario Hockey League (OHL) game against the Niagara Ice Dogs in St. Catharines, a small city that’s a 120 km (75 mile) drive south of Toronto. We spoke in the modest hotel where the Wolves were staying, after arriving earlier in the day on their team bus following a five-hour drive from Sudbury in northern Ontario.

Despite being from Israel, where hockey is, at best, marginal, Levin’s involvement in the sport is less surprising given his family’s background. His mother, Lena, moved to Israel from Russia where hockey is popular. But more importantly, his father, Pavel, immigrated from Lativa where he played recreational hockey and was a professional soccer player.

In Israel, after first playing for the Maccabi Tel Aviv soccer team, Pavel created a youth sports club and a roller and ice hockey school for which he takes students to Metulla on the border with Lebanon to play at Israel’s best ice hockey facility.

“I went to Metulla a couple of times to try ice hockey,” says Levin, “but I didn’t really like it. I couldn’t skate so I went back to roller hockey.”

Until age 9, he also played soccer, tennis and basketball — but excelled in roller hockey under his father’s guidance. For several years, he played for an Israeli youth team, competing in tournaments in Europe from 2010. Due to his standout ability, coaches representing several countries at the tournament suggested Pavel send his son to Canada to develop his hockey talent on ice. That planted the idea in Levin’s head.

Since then, his hockey odyssey has proven compelling enough to attract considerable media attention in North America in recent years.

David Levin playing inline hockey in Israel before he learned
to play ice hockey in Canada.

In a lengthy 2016 profile in The New York Times, Levin spoke of how he was influenced by watching NHL games on TV with his father in Israel, starting at age 7 or 8. He said that’s how he developed a love for the game, supplemented by watching NHL highlights on YouTube.

“I remember seeing a film about Sidney Crosby when he was young and how he worked hard every day on his hockey skills to get better. That’s what I wanted to do, too,” Levin told the reporter, referring to the current Pittsburgh Penguins superstar.

Levin, a left-handed forward, is now in his third year with the Sudbury Wolves. They are one of 20 teams in the OHL, a major junior league closely followed by scouts for NHL teams. After making the playoffs last year, Sudbury is struggling this season, mired in last place in the 10-team Eastern Conference. Likewise, Levin’s offensive output is down from last year, in part due to a major knee injury in late October that caused him to miss 18 games. As of mid-February, he had 12 goals and 13 assists for 25 points.

Cory Stillman, head coach of the Wolves, is a big supporter of Levin.

“Despite how late he began playing hockey, I’m not surprised where David is today,” says Stillman, who played 16 seasons in the NHL. “Great athletes often pick up a sport at a later age. David developed his hands and shot playing roller hockey. Skating came after. The more he works and plays, the better his skating will become. He’s still young and showing improvement. I think he has a good chance of being drafted in June.”

In 2015, following an excellent season (39 goals, 41 assists) in Toronto’s Minor Midget Hockey League, Sudbury chose Levin as the first overall pick in that year’s OHL priority selection draft.

It linked him to some of hockey’s biggest names, such as Connor McDavid, Steven Stamkos and John Tavares, all current NHL stars who previously were first overall picks in the OHL.

“Being the top choice was amazing,” Levin later told a reporter for the NHL website. “It was the best moment of my life. It brought me one step closer to my dream. But after a couple of games, no one really cares anymore. You just have to show on the ice why you went first overall in the draft.”

It was pretty heady stuff for a 15-year-old kid, especially one who only three years earlier had begun a new life in Canada with almost no ice hockey experience, had never worn a full set of hockey equipment and who didn’t even know how to stop on his skates.

Israeli-born David Levin didn’t put on skates until he was 12.

Levin arrived in Toronto in the summer of 2012 and stayed with his aunt and uncle, who had previously lived in Israel after moving there from Russia. Weeks later, just shy of his 13th birthday, he enrolled at a private high school that specializes in developing elite sports talent. There, Levin began the transition from roller skates to ice skates under the tutelage of the hockey staff.

“At first, it was really hard for me,” Levin recalls. “I didn’t know any English. I was sitting in class without understanding anything. As for the hockey, I didn’t know how to skate and the first time I went on the ice I crashed into the boards because I didn’t know how to stop.”

Whatever Levin may have lacked then, his determination helped see him through any difficulties. When he wasn’t in class, he was either on the ice or in the gym. In 2014, he earned a spot on a local team in the city’s highest youth hockey division and had a strong season. His parents and brother came from Israel to watch him play in the championship which Levin’s team lost in overtime.

Better late than never

The road to hockey glory is long, arduous and highly competitive. For most professional players, it begins at age 3 or 4 when they start skating, followed a year or two later by playing organized hockey — in places, such as Canada, where the sport is popular and arenas are plentiful. Gifted players also often play for their school teams before being scouted by major junior teams. Only a tiny minority ultimately make it to the NHL.

While Levin may share the same destination with his current teammates, his route for getting there has been radically different from all the rest.

“The biggest challenge for me was leaving my parents, younger brother and best friends behind in Israel,” says Levin. “That was tough and it’s still not easy.”

In Sudbury, home to 160,000 residents, the biggest difficulty for Levin has been the extremely cold winters. Located 415 km northwest of Toronto, the city has a small Jewish community of 250 people (that surprisingly has never reached out to their Israeli hockey phenom).

Levin is the only Jewish player on his team and sole Israeli in the OHL. On a few occasions, opposing players have taunted him about his background.

“There have been a few incidents against me,” Levin says calmly. “Some happened when we were playing in other rinks. Those who made comments about Israel thought they were jokes but I didn’t find them funny because I’m from there and I know what’s happening there and they don’t. But I just have to keep moving forward and not let it bother me. It doesn’t get me down as I know I’m well liked, especially by my teammates.”

When asked to elaborate on what happened, he becomes circumspect.

“It doesn’t really matter the specific comments,” adds Levin. “I prefer not to say the names of the players who said negative things or even identify the teams they’re on.”

Last year, a player from an opposing team was suspended for 10 games after the referee heard what he said to Levin during a game. The player later called Levin to apologize.

As for his own team, made up mostly of Canadians and Americans along with two Russians, Levin insists he’s never heard a negative word from his teammates.

When he dons his equipment and Sudbury Wolves jersey, with “71” emblazoned on the back, Levin feels he’s playing for his team, himself and his country.

“Coincidentally, the main colors of the Sudbury jersey are the Israeli colors of blue and white,” says Levin. “Because that makes me think of Israel, when I’m stepping on the ice, I try to do my best for people in Israel including those who think they can be hockey players too. I want to show everyone they should never give up.”

Unlike other OHL players, Levin has faced the question of his compulsory army service in Israel. In late 2016, he received a temporary deferment from the IDF. His family and agent are working on getting an extended one that’s granted extremely rarely to elite athletes.

Having turned 18 last fall, Levin is keenly aware his friends back home are now serving in the IDF while he’s in Canada playing hockey.

“I love my country, all the people there and that everyone is helping each other,” says Levin, who’s spoken to both the Israeli embassy in Ottawa and the consulate in Toronto about this matter. “Without wanting to sound cocky, not many kids have a talent that would allow them to be the first person from their country to be drafted and possibly play in the NHL. So, people back home have to respect that. It’s going to make Israelis proud.”

Asked what the embassy and consulate told him, Levin answered: “They said, ‘Just worry about hockey for now and get drafted by an NHL team in June and then we’ll go from there.’”

Levin, who at 1.77 m (5’10”) and 77 kilos (170 lbs.) is smaller than most NHL players today, is upbeat about his hockey future.

“I think there are really good chances I’ll be drafted,” he says. “If I keep playing well during the rest of this season, playing hard, I’m optimistic. I really don’t care what team chooses me. It’s my dream to be drafted and play in the NHL.”

Over the NHL’s 100-year history, relatively few Jews and no Israelis have played in the league. In 2000, Max Birbraer, who was born in Kazakhstan and only moved to Israel when he was 14, became the first and only player with Israeli citizenship to be drafted by an NHL team, but never played in a league game.

On ice, in the wolf pack

Following the interview, Levin joined his teammates for the five-minute bus ride from the hotel to the Meridan Centre in St. Catharines. After the pre-game warm-up and the playing of Canada’s national anthem, the Sudbury Wolves faced off against the Niagara Ice Dogs before 4,000 fans.

Throughout the game, playing center and left wing, Levin showed great concentration and poise. Late in the third period, he set up his team’s tying goal on a power play, making a slap-pass to a linemate who scored a few minutes before Niagara won in overtime.

The next day, in an afternoon game in Hamilton, 75 km (46 miles) west of St. Catharines, Levin scored one of Sudbury’s two goals as his team lost 3-2.

This is no ordinary amateur sports team: During the six-month, 68-game regular season, the Wolves play, on average, three games a week. Many involve extended bus rides from Sudbury. The longest trip is eight hours to Flint, Michigan and slightly less to Erie, Pennsylvania. Coupled with almost daily practices, it’s a demanding routine.

Levin’s parents stay up late to watch most games via a live stream on their computer at home in Israel. The next day, Pavel often calls his son to discuss his on-ice performance.

Levin is constantly working on improving his game. He has no choice if he wants to advance.

“Like many players, David needs to work on consistency in his game,” says Coach Stillman. “To become a pro, you need to be good every day, in practices and games.”

In June, Levin’s parents, brother and agent will join him in Dallas for the NHL draft.

So far, scouts from five NHL teams (Pittsburgh, Chicago, New Jersey, Buffalo and Calgary) have interviewed him as part of their evaluation process of possible draftees.

“They ask you all kinds of questions,” says Levin. “Most are about you and your life off the ice. It’s really important for them that you’re a good person. They ask about your family and what kind of guy you are. They also give you questions to answer in writing. If they think you’re selfish and bad with your teammates, you’re done. I think it’s good NHL teams do this because they put a lot of money into everything and they don’t want a player to embarrass them.”

Amid the pressure and spotlight, Levin remains even-keeled and steadfast.

“With his world-class talent and burning desire to be the best, I believe David will be drafted in June,” says Ryan Barnes, his agent since 2015. “He has elite skill and great hockey sense, and is driven to constantly get better.”

If Levin is a pioneer when it comes to Israelis in North American hockey, he’s already inspired others, including his 12-year-old brother who has taken up the sport and hopes to follow in his big brother’s footsteps.

David Levin, right, with Cory Stillman, the coach of the
Sudbury Wolves.

“Two Israeli kids from my dad’s hockey school moved to Canada after me,” says Levin. “There were three Israelis at the school that I attended in Toronto. Two of them have since returned to Israel but one is still there and he hopes to do what I’ve done. That’s his dream.”

Regardless of whether Levin makes the NHL, he’s already demonstrated dreams are worth pursuing, even if, at first, they seem unattainable. No small feat for an 18-year-old far from home.

2018 Olympics see historic first for Canadian women’s hockey

2018 Olympics see historic first for Canadian women's hockey

By Bryn Levy –

As the Canadian women’s hockey team gears up for the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, one player has made history before even stepping onto the ice.

Defenceman Brigette Lacquette is the first-ever First Nations woman to make the team, and she’s been basking in an outpouring of well-wishes from across the country ever since she cracked the roster.

“I’m super excited and I think having all that extra support from all the First Nations across Canada is definitely very special for me,” she said Tuesday during a national media call.

Lacquette is originally from the Cote First Nation near Kamsack, Sask., but moved with her family to the small community of Mallard, Man. that she now calls home.

Growing up, Lacquette said seeing fellow First Nations Manitoban Jordin Tootoo skate in the 2003 World Juniors was a moment that made her believe she could make it to the world’s biggest stage.

Now, she said she hopes her play in Pyeongchang sends a message to the next wave of little girls imagining themselves wearing the Maple Leaf.

“You can achieve anything you put your mind to. It doesn’t matter where you come from. You can always achieve your dreams,” she said.

Lacquette said she was thankful for the support she’s had from her First Nation, coaches and teammates along the way, but said she was especially grateful to her parents, Terance and Anita,

After being a late cut ahead of the 2014 games in Sochi, Russia, she said it was a thrill to get to call her Dad this year and tell him his hours of coaching and building a backyard rink for her every winter had paid off.

“There’s only wi-fi, so he was hanging out by the wi-fi waiting for me to call him and he was just super excited. To finally tell him that I made the team was special.”

Lacquette and the rest of Team Canada will be looking for their fifth-consecutive gold medal in women’s hockey when the Winter Games kick off Feb. 9.

Caymen Islands Ice Rink Update

By Caymen Compass

Word of plans for a 4,000-seat ice stadium in Grand Cayman emerged in late 2014, when a group of Canadian entrepreneurs pitched membership packages to potential clients.

At the time, the plan, according to Tim Best, CEO of Cayman Ice Palace, was to attract NHL teams, a Disney on Ice show and major concerts to the arena.

Originally intended to be situated next to Cost-U-Less, the intended site was moved to George Town. Former planning minister Kurt Tibbetts publicly endorsed the project, telling crowds at a Chamber of Commerce lunch in 2015 that it would be a key part of the revitalization of George Town.

Very little has happened since that time, however, and no plans have been submitted to the Central Planning Authority.

Mr. Best told the Compass, for this article, that he still believes the project will happen, though it may alter from what was initially envisaged.

“I have and will continue to work tirelessly to build a multi-purpose entertainment facility as part of an entertainment district in George Town,” he said.

“Research shows this will be an excellent avenue for the prosperity of not only downtown but for all of Cayman. To that end, my commitment is unwavering until this project becomes a reality.”

Costa Rica: Land of Rainforests, Rivers, Volcanoes …. and Ice Hockey

That’s right…Ice Hockey…In Costa Rica!

Certainly known for special and amazing experiences, but not your typical hot bed for ice hockey, Costa Rica just quietly held its first ever international Ice Hockey tournament. This unlikely tournament was the long time dream of the ex-pat & Calgary native, Bruce Callow, who more than two decades ago brought the sport of hockey to Costa Rica.

“It was a great feeling to help bring this event to life. It was a mixture of a lot of emotions being both a player and an organizer.” said founder and tournament organizer Bruce Callow who recently celebrated the 20 year anniversary of this program.

With support from the NHLPA (NHL Players Association) Goals and Dreams Fund, Bruce was able to keep this program moving forward from its humble beginnings on synthetic ice to moving into the El Castillo Country Club where they now have a rink about half the size of a normal NHL rink.

El Castillo is now home to The Castillo Knights who have, against all odds, put together a solid program that fielded a tournament team their country could be proud of. The team was composed of founder Bruce Callow, captained by the formidable former OHLer Aurelio Cence, with players like the veteran Mike Mirtl, young speedster David Aviles, Robert Vinet, Anthony Callow, Jorge Castiglione, Mariano Finizio and backstopped by the talented and promising goaltender Franklin Ordenez.

Going forward, this tournament will be instrumental in continuing to move the program forward. To be able to be a part of it was something I will remember and cherish forever! In fact, the majority of the participants could agree that it was an incredibly unique opportunity to play hockey abroad and be a part of helping this young hockey program grow there. I think I speak for all of us when I say this tournament was the highlight of our recreational league “careers.” Teams from Calgary, Canada, Los Angeles, USA and the Falkland Islands came to participate in this thrilling inaugural tournament. Without the dedication and hospitality of the organizers this never could have happened.

The Tournament took place the weekend of November 18th-19th, 2017. Most of the teams arrived in Costa Rica a few days before the tournament to enjoy the exotic and popular vacation destination before turning their attention to the upcoming tournament. With 4 games in just two days they would not only have a difficult challenge, physically speaking, but would also have to adapt to the smaller ice surface, no glass along the boards and 3 vs 3 tournament format.

All in all the tournament was a huge success. In a flurry of activity, each team playing two games a day, all teams battled for every inch of ice and the games were quite close. Speak with any tournament organizer and they will tell you that when organizing a tournament with unknown teams from different locations, let alone different countries, it is a challenge to asses team strength and skill and achieve good parity among participating teams. This time, however, the hockey gods smiled upon us and we all agreed the parity was about as close as you can get for a first ever tournament of this nature.

“It was quite an exhausting experience and I am sure the next one will be easier to organize. Having the stands of the rink full of fans cheering for hockey was a surreal and unforgettable experience.” – Bruce Callow

Though all of the games were hotly contested, ultimately the Canadian Citizens from Calgary and Ruination from Los Angeles would face off in an all to familiar USA vs Canada  gold medal game. After a hard fought game that would see the lead change multiple times the Calgary Citizens would raise the first ever El Castillo Ice Hockey Tournament trophy after their well deserved 7-5 victory over our US team. I have to say, the trophy could could not have gone to a more classy team. Congratulations on making history boys!

Ultimately, there was a whole other side to this competition that far outweighed the simple concept of who would win and who would lose. (Although as athletes and competitors everyone certainly played their hardest with winning in mind.) It was about something bigger than ourselves or any one team. Being a part of growing the sport so far from home and helping this young program get to the next level was real reason we were all here.

What made this tournament so special for me, for us all, was that we all bought in to this idea and the camaraderie was unlike anything I have experienced in a tournament before. We all came away with new friends from other countries and that in itself speaks volumes for what took place here in Costa Rica.

At the end of the day the Castillo Knights were the big winners. Despite all odds and with limited resources they put together a team that competed above its level against teams significantly more experienced. They were the David to the visiting Goliaths and their heart and tenacity not only won over the fans, many watching live hockey for the first time in their lives, but earned the respect and admiration of us visitors. Additionally, the atmosphere in that club was incredible and contagious as it was easy to get caught up in the excitement and emotion watching the other games. If this first taste of Costa Rican Hockey is any indicator, this program has a bright future!

Hats off to what you have accomplished down in Costa Rica Bruce! We all hope to visit and compete again in Costa Rica in 2018. Thank you for keeping the dream alive all these years and letting us all play a part. That was one hell of a weekend we will not soon forget!


Sport minister exploring prospect of ice hockey in Jamaica

Olivia Grange, Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport prepares
to poke the puck away from Greame Townsend, National Hockey Coach (2nd left)
as it is being released by Donovan Tait, hockey player and coach (left). Looking on
in anticipation are: Dorothy McLeod, Director, California Cultural Alliance (3rd left);
founding members of the Jamaica Olympic Ice Hockey Federation Judith Smith (4th left)
and Lester Griffin (right). The Jamaica Olympic Ice Hockey Federation and representatives
from Tropical Ice Ventures of Canada paid a Courtesy Call on the Minister today
(December 1) at her offices in Kingston. 

By Jamaica Observer

Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Olivia Grange says she is excited about the prospects of an ice hockey arena being established in Jamaica.

Grange met today with a group from the Jamaica Olympic Ice Hockey Federation and from the firm, Tropical Ice Ventures of Canada, which is a leader in refrigeration technology.

CEO of Tropical Ice Ventures, Jason Swales, disclosed that he had identified an investor in Canada who is interested in building an ice arena along with a hotel on the island.

“Teams are lining up to play ice hockey in Jamaica and there are hundreds of spectators from overseas who would visit Jamaica to attend ice hockey matches,” Swales is reported as saying in a release from the ministry.

Grange said that beach-front property in Trelawny is being eyed for the establishment of the ice rink, adding that her ministry intended to engage the Urban Development Corporation which owns the land.

Ice hockey delegation here this week

By Jamaica Observer

A delegation from the Jamaican Olympic Ice Hockey Federation (JOIHF) will be in the island this week for a series of meetings with government and sporting associations.

JOIHF, which was established in 2009 and became affiliated to the Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) shortly thereafter, has been systematically building the sport amongst Jamiacan players in Canada and the United States, focusing on the Under-21 group.

So far, the team has played successfully in a number of tournaments in Toronto and in Nova Scotia. Most recently the Jamaica Under-21 team comprehensively beat a select Nova Scotia Under-21 team 5-1 in an excellent display of knowledge, skill and tactics. Several of the Jamaican players compete in the Toronto leagues on a regular basis. The Jamaican public will be able to see this match on local television this week at a time to be announced.

The main purpose of the visit of the delegation is to provide an update on the plans for the development of the sport amongst Jamaicans here and to initiate discussions regarding the building and maintenance of an ice rink here. having an ice rink is essential to the team playing in qualifying tournaments for the Olympic Games. At the moment, JOIHF is an affiliate member of the international federation because it does not have an ice rink in jamaica.

The delegation of seven includes the national coach for the team, Graeme Townsend (son of veteran journalist Errol Townsend). Graeme is the first Jamaican to play professionally in the National Hockey League (NHL) and spent over 10 years playing for a number of teams, including the Boston Bruins. Townsend runs an ice hockey school in Canada and is committed to developing local players who can make the grade playing ice hockey in the NHL.

In this regard he is prepared to host up to six local athletes each year who he can work on, teaching them skating skills and the rudiments of the game.

The delegation also includes the CEO of Tropical Ice Ventures, an ice rink manufacturig company that has designed and built ice rinks in hot climates like Dubai, Mexico and Brazil, to name a few.

The delegation has meetings scheduled with the minister of sport Olivia Grange, the JOA, universities and colleges, the local hockey fraternity, and tourism and hotel interests here.

Comtois, Harvey rise to the challenge as QMJHL takes series in shootout finale

By 2017 CIBC Canada Russia Series

Moncton, NB – Now in its farewell season, the Moncton Coliseum has one more memory to include in its extensive 44-year history. One one of the most exciting nights in the 15-year history of the CIBC Canada Russia Series saw Russia score late to win Game 6 by a score of 2-1 before Team QMJHL captured the series on a shootout winner from Anaheim Ducks prospect Maxime Comtois (Victoriaville Tigres).

The Russian Game 6 victory came on a late goal from Comtois’ newly acquired teammate Vitalii Abramov (Victoriaville Tigres) as the Russians tied the series at nine points apiece.

The series would be settled in a shootout, one where Team QMJHL goaltender Samuel Harvey (Rouyn-Noranda Huskies) emerged as the hero. Harvey stopped all five shooters he faced, turning away Mikhail Maltsev to seal the deal and give the Canadian Hockey League its third straight series victory behind Comtois’ lone shootout marker.

“I gotta be honest, it’s my go-to move,” said Comtois with a smile. “I saw our two guys go first before me and watched the goalie all the way and found a weakness between the pads. I just kept it simple and it worked out.

“We knew when we lost the game in regulation we deserved the series,” Comtois added. “We played so hard, we played with structure and Harvey played two awesome games for us.”

Harvey’s 31 saves gave Team QMJHL a chance to win Game 6 and his five stops in the shootout paved the way to a series victory.

“We lost the game but we came back in the shootout and we’re very happy now,” he said. “Comtois came through with a huge goal and its just a great feeling to win this.”

Harvey was rewarded for his fine play in Tuesday’s Game 5, getting the call from head coach Dominique Ducharme (Drummondville Voltigeurs) once again.

For the first time in the series however, Russia would get on the board first as leading scorer Alexey Polodyan stretched his point streak to five games. The speedy winger orchestrated a give-and-go with linemate Andrey Altybarmakyan, wiring a shot over the shoulder of Harvey from the right circle at 8:16.

After Joe Veleno (Saint John Sea Dogs) had what looked to be the tying goal pulled off the goal line by Russian defenceman Daniil Kurashov, Team QMJHL drew even at 10:20 as Philadelphia Flyers prospect Pascal Laberge (Victoriaville Tigres) tipped a Jocktan Chainey (Halifax Mooseheads) point shot past Alexey Melnichuk.

Team QMJHL managed to survive a late Russian power play to close out the first period as big saves from Harvey off Maxim Tsyplakov and German Rubtsov (Acadie-Bathurst Titan) kept the game tied at one.

The second period was all about the goaltenders as Harvey and Melnichuk went save-for-save to keep the score tied at one through 40 minutes with Russia outshooting Team QMJHL 18-17.

Harvey’s second period was highlighted by a pair of saves off defending QMJHL scoring champion Abramov, providing a big glove denial of the Columbus Blue Jackets prospect inside the final five minutes of the frame.

The hero of the night, Comtois elevated his play in the third period, serving as a catalyst for a pair of Shawn Boudrias (Gatineau Olympiques) scoring chances that were denied by Melnichuk.

Harvey managed to keep the game tied with a save off Artyom Manukyan alone in the slot with five minutes remaining, but Russia would prevail before time ran out as Rubtsov and Abramov capitalized on a 2-on-1 rush.

After Rubtsov blocked a shot at the defensive blue line, the two were off to the races as Abramov slipped a rebound under the pad of Harvey. The puck snuck over the goal line at 17:03, bringing a hush to the 6,253 in attendance at the Moncton Coliseum.

Russia would ride out the remaining three minutes of regulation, out shooting the QMJHL 33-24 on the night to hold on for a big 2-1 victory and force a series determining shootout.

With Team QMJHL shooting first, Melnichuk and Harvey both turned away the first two opponents they faced before Comtois managed to snap a hard shot through the legs of the Russian goaltender. Harvey proceeded to stop Manukyan, Altybarmakyan and Maltsev to give the CHL a 10-9 series win in points.

“We had to play for the series in the shootout and we got it done,” said head coach Ducharme post game. “Overall, I think our guys deserved this.”

After 15 years of the CIBC Canada Russia Series the CHL boasts an overall record of 61-22-1-6, with the QMJHL playing to a mark of 17-10-3. Russia holds an overall record of 29-58-0-3.

The CHL has now won the CIBC Canada Russia Series 12 times in the event’s 15-year history.

Harvey the difference as Team QMJHL triumphs in Charlottetown

By 2017 CIBC Canada Russia Series

Charlottetown, PEI – Russia came out firing early but Team QMJHL finished strong, outlasting their opponent in a 3-1 victory in Game 5 of the CIBC Canada Russia Series.

Samuel Harvey (Rouyn-Noranda Huskies) turned in a 25 save performance, denying several high quality Russian scoring opportunities as the CHL took a 9-6 lead in points entering Thursday’s series finale in Moncton.

“He had a strong game for sure and made some key saves at the right moments,” Team QMJHL head coach Dominique Ducharme (Drummondville Voltigeurs) said of Harvey, who became the Rouyn-Noranda Huskies all-time goaltending wins leader last week. “We need to be good at every position and we were certainly good in net tonight. He stood out for sure.”

Team Russia came with intensity in the early moments of Game 5, forcing Harvey into some big saves in order to keep his team in the game.

After Team QMJHL failed to record a shot on goal in the opening nine minutes of action, their first quality chance went into the net as Shawn Boudrias (Gatineau Olympiques), a former Islander, brought the Charlottetown faithful to their feet.

QMJHL captain Peter Abbandonato (Rouyn-Noranda Huskies) won an offensive zone draw as Boudrias carved a path to the net, snapping a quick shot over the shoulder of Alexey Melnichuk at 12:31.

The Russians responded under three minutes later as Chicago Blackhawks prospect Andrey Altybarmakyan scored his third of the series. Speedy linemate Alexey Polodyan forced a turnover at the Russian blue line, carrying the puck up ice to force a rebound off the pad of Harvey that found its way straight onto the stick of an oncoming Altybarmakyan who tied the score at one.

Russia carried the play, outshooting the QMJHL 11-6 in the first frame.

Harvey’s fine play carried over into the second stanza as the 19-year-old provided a breakaway save off Damir Rakhimullin and turned away Maxim Rasseykin on a one-timer in the slot moments later.

Team QMJHL managed to hold Russia’s power play at bay, being outshot 8-5 in the second for a two-period total of 19-11.

Ottawa Senators prospect Drake Batherson (Cape Breton Screaming Eagles) put Team QMJHL in the lead for good 4:11 into the third period, striking for the team’s second power play marker of the night. 2018 NHL Draft prospect Joe Veleno (Saint John Sea Dogs) moved a puck down low to Anaheim Ducks draftee Maxime Comtois (Victoriaville Tigres) who made a power move to the net, creating an opportunity in the slot as Batherson cleaned up a loose puck in the crease.

The grind of five games in three different provinces over the past week seemed to catch up with the Russians in the third period as they were limited to seven shots in the final 20 minutes but still managed to outshoot the QMJHL 26-24 on the night.

Nicolas Guay (Drummondville Voltigeurs) would add an unassisted empty net goal with 27 seconds remaining to secure a 3-1 victory for Team QMJHL, giving them four straight wins against Russia dating back to 2015.

Team QMJHL went 2-for-3 on the man advantage while holding Russia to an 0-for-5 mark. The Russians are now 1-for-13 on the power play throughout the series.

Team QMJHL featured a roster loaded with young talent including four 2000-born standouts in Joe Veleno (Saint John Sea Dogs), Noah Dobson (Acadie-Bathurst Titan) and the Halifax Mooseheads duo of forward Benoit-Olivier Groulx and Jared McIsaac. All four players won gold medals with Canada at the Ivan Hlinka Memorial Tournament this past summer and saw plenty of ice in Tuesday’s victory.

“I really liked the way our young guys performed,” Ducharme added post-game. “You could see at the beginning we needed to make an adjustment but we got better and better and I really liked our third period.

“We managed the game well, we were good on the power play and we didn’t give them much late in the game.”

Up 9-6 in points, a QMJHL win on Thursday in Moncton would secure a third straight series victory for the Canadian Hockey League.

Thursday’s Game 6 will be the final CIBC Canada Russia Series matchup held at the Moncton Coliseum that will give way to a brand new facility set to open in September 2018.

Catch the series finale Thursday on Sportsnet East, Ontario and Pacific when the puck drops at 7:00pm ET/4:00pm PT.

Suzuki and Timmins connect as Team OHL strikes back in Sudbury

By 2017 CIBC Canada Russia Series

Sudbury, ON – Vegas Golden Knights prospect Nick Suzuki (Owen Sound Attack) and Colorado Avalanche second rounder Conor Timmins (Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds) both had three points, leading Team OHL to a 4-2 victory in Game 4 of the 2017 CIBC Canada Russia Series in Sudbury.

Team OHL rebounded from a 5-2 loss in Game 3 as a pair of quick third period goals broke open a 2-2 tie. Suzuki scored his second of the night for the game winner 4:09 into the final frame.

“We didn’t want to come here and go down 0-2 against the Russians, so it was good to get the job done tonight,” said Suzuki post-game. “I thought the whole team worked really hard and we got the result we wanted.”

Typically Western Conference foes, Suzuki and Timmins connected three different times in the win.

“When you’re on a power play with a guy like Suzuki and others like Tippett, Katchouk and Gadjovich, you just want to move the puck and let them do their thing,” said Timmins of his approach. “That worked out nicely for us tonight.”

Team OHL head coach Trevor Letowski (Windsor Spitfires) came away impressed with his club’s effort, citing better execution in the win as the series heads east knotted 6-6 in points.

“I really liked our compete level again,” Letowski noted. “Our power play is really dangerous and it played a big factor in the game and I thought DiPietro was very solid in net and made some good saves when he had to.

“Overall our guys dug in and we really wanted to get that one,” Letowski added. “Obviously we weren’t happy with the loss in Owen Sound. The boys are proud of being here and representing the league and they wanted to have a good showing. I thought we did that tonight.”

The Owen Sound tandem of Gadjovich and Suzuki went to work offensively early on Team OHL’s first power play of the night at 3:12 of the first. The former provided a screen in the slot while the latter ripped a wrister over the shoulder of Vladislav Sukhachev in the Russian crease to put Team OHL up 1-0.

After being outshot 6-1 in the opening five minutes of action, Russia responded at 6:36 as Chicago Blackhawks prospect Andrey Altybarmakyan forged a lane to the net and beat DiPietro on a forehand move off the rush.

Sukhachev provided some timely saves in the latter half of the first period, stopping Gadjovich on a backhand opportunity before getting a little help from his post as Jonathan Ang (Peterborough Petes) struck iron inside the final minute.

Both goaltenders provided big glove saves in the opening shifts of the second as both Sukhachev and DiPietro kept the score knotted at one before a local fan favourite used his big shot to put Russia in the lead.

After a pair of failed OHL clearing attempts, Sudbury Wolves star Dmitry Sokolov drifted through the slot and took a pass from Artyom Manukyan to beat DiPietro under the crossbar at 8:29.

Team OHL re-established the tie just over three minutes later as the power play struck again. After being set up by Timmins earlier in the game, Suzuki returned the favour, putting the puck on a tee for the Colorado Avalanche prospect who blasted home a slapshot at 11:53.

Team OHL outshot Russia 14-7 in the second for a two-period total of 27-19 as the game entered the third period in a 2-2 tie.

The OHL carried its momentum from a strong second over into the third as Suzuki picked up his second goal and third point of the night at 4:09.

Suzuki was sprung in alone on an outlet pass from Timmins, dekeing to the forehand before sliding a low shot through the legs of Sukhachev to give Team OHL a 3-2 edge. Owen Sound Attack teammate Sean Durzi also picked up an assist on the go-ahead goal.

Big 17-year-old blueliner Kevin Bahl (Ottawa 67’s) gave Team OHL some much-needed insurance just 31 seconds later. Bahl, who’s scored just once in 78 career OHL regular season contests, picked up his first of the 2017-18 season on a wrister through traffic. With Gadjovich providing another valuable screen out front, Bahl picked a corner and put Team OHL up 4-2 with roughly 15 minutes to go.

DiPietro stood his ground in the late going, but Team OHL tightened things up and held the Russians to just six shots on goal in the final frame to take a 4-2 victory.

The OHL outshot Russia 33-25 and went 2-for-6 on the power play while limiting their opponents to just one power play opportunity.

Team OHL improves to an all-time record of 24-5-1 in the CIBC Canada Russia Series while Russia drops to 1-13-0-1 all-time in Game 4 of the series.

The series shifts to Charlottetown, PEI on Tuesday night as Team QMJHL awaits Russia for Game 5. The action gets underway at 7:00pm ET/8:00AT on Sportsnet East, Ontario and Pacific.

Falklands ice hockey team in international tournament in Costa Rica

By Merco Press South Atlantic News Agency

Costa Rica will be hosting the first Castillo International Ice Hockey Tournament with the participation of a home team, and three international sides, including one form the Falkland Islands. The competition is scheduled to take place at the Castillo Country Club in San Rafael de Heredia, on 18/19 November.

 “The idea cropped up during a trip five years ago to the Falkland Islands, in 2012, where I met representatives of local teams. Later on I also made ice hockey friends with people from Calgary and Los Angeles, and finally we managed to organize the competition and a schedule”, according to Bruce Callow, organizer of the event and founder of the Costa Rica Castillo Knights team.

The overseas teams are the Stanley All-Stars from the Falklands, Canadian Citizens and Ruination from LA. The competition will be played at the Senior category and includes some former professionals such as goalie Jason Wood from UK.

“At the end of the day, this first ice hockey tournament in Central America is geared to make the sport grow, to attract young people of all ages, and this kind of events will help promote the ice hockey game in Costa Rica”, adds Callow. “I can assure you that once you’ve tried hockey and get the knack of it, you’ll forget about soccer”.

Callow advanced that for next year’s edition there has also been strong interest from teams in Puerto Rico, Mexico and Argentina, which are planning to participate.

Likewise he also revealed that ice hockey has been played in Costa Rica for twenty years and the Castillo Country Club offers its members the chance of learning to play the game. The ice ring was only recently remodeled and can hold some fifty skiers at the time.

According to the schedule Stanley All Stars play hosts Castillo Knights on the morning of Saturday 18th November, and in the afternoon Canadian Citizens. On Sunday morning Falklands play Ruination from Los Angeles, and in the afternoon, at 14:00 hours and 16:00 hours, the bronze and gold medals will be disputed.

Falklands will be represented by Stanley-All Stars

Falklands will be represented by Stanley-All Stars

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